Charly W. Karl

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laboratoryequipment:

Researchers Probe Virus in Nine Paralysis CasesHealth officials are investigating nine cases of muscle weakness or paralysis in Colorado children and whether the culprit might be a virus causing severe respiratory illness across the country.The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Friday sent doctors an alert about the polio-like cases and said the germ — enterovirus 68 — was detected in four out of eight of the sick children who had a certain medical test. The status of the ninth case is unclear.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/09/researchers-probe-virus-nine-paralysis-cases

laboratoryequipment:

Researchers Probe Virus in Nine Paralysis Cases

Health officials are investigating nine cases of muscle weakness or paralysis in Colorado children and whether the culprit might be a virus causing severe respiratory illness across the country.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Friday sent doctors an alert about the polio-like cases and said the germ — enterovirus 68 — was detected in four out of eight of the sick children who had a certain medical test. The status of the ninth case is unclear.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/09/researchers-probe-virus-nine-paralysis-cases

laboratoryequipment:

Formula Could Yield Greener ConcreteConcrete is the world’s most-used construction material and a leading contributor to global warming, producing as much as one-tenth of industry-generated greenhouse-gas emissions. Now, a new study suggests a way in which those emissions could be reduced by more than half — and the result would be a stronger, more durable material.The findings come from the most detailed molecular analysis yet of the complex structure of concrete, which is a mixture of sand, gravel, water and cement. Cement is made by cooking calcium-rich material, usually limestone, with silica-rich material — typically clay — at temperatures of 1,500 C, yielding a hard mass called “clinker.” This is then ground up into a powder. The decarbonation of limestone, and the heating of cement, are responsible for most of the material’s greenhouse-gas output.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/09/formula-could-yield-greener-concrete

laboratoryequipment:

Formula Could Yield Greener Concrete

Concrete is the world’s most-used construction material and a leading contributor to global warming, producing as much as one-tenth of industry-generated greenhouse-gas emissions. Now, a new study suggests a way in which those emissions could be reduced by more than half — and the result would be a stronger, more durable material.

The findings come from the most detailed molecular analysis yet of the complex structure of concrete, which is a mixture of sand, gravel, water and cement. Cement is made by cooking calcium-rich material, usually limestone, with silica-rich material — typically clay — at temperatures of 1,500 C, yielding a hard mass called “clinker.” This is then ground up into a powder. The decarbonation of limestone, and the heating of cement, are responsible for most of the material’s greenhouse-gas output.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/09/formula-could-yield-greener-concrete

laboratoryequipment:

Stone Age Tools Weren’t African InventionA new discovery of thousands of Stone Age tools has provided a major insight into human innovation 325,000 years ago and how early technological developments spread across the world, according to research published in the journal Science.Researchers from Royal Holloway, Univ. of London, together with an international team from across the U.S. and Europe, have found evidence which challenges the belief that a type of technology known as Levallois – where the flakes and blades of stones were used to make useful products such as hunting weapons – was invented in Africa and then spread to other continents as the human population expanded.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/09/stone-age-tools-werent-african-invention

laboratoryequipment:

Stone Age Tools Weren’t African Invention

A new discovery of thousands of Stone Age tools has provided a major insight into human innovation 325,000 years ago and how early technological developments spread across the world, according to research published in the journal Science.

Researchers from Royal Holloway, Univ. of London, together with an international team from across the U.S. and Europe, have found evidence which challenges the belief that a type of technology known as Levallois – where the flakes and blades of stones were used to make useful products such as hunting weapons – was invented in Africa and then spread to other continents as the human population expanded.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/09/stone-age-tools-werent-african-invention