Charly W. Karl

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italianartsociety:

By Sean Roberts, Villa I Tatti

On this day in 1440 the Florentine humanist Francesco Berlinghieri was born.  Like generations of Berlinghieri men, he enjoyed modest success in his native city’s political establishment. Francesco is remembered today, however, primarily for the poetic undertaking that occupied more than two decades of his life, the Septe giornate della geographia or Seven Days of Geography. Deeply impressed by Florence’s literary heritage and the fashionable revival of classical texts, Francesco fused the language of Dante with the ancient mathematical geography of Claudius Ptolemy. Berlinghieri’s description of the known world in Tuscan verse was produced both in lavish manuscripts and in a printed edition of 1482. The massive maps that accompanied both printed and illuminated examples of the book represented the most significant cartographic project and the most elaborate series of prints produced in fifteenth-century Florence. Berlinghieri’s image of the earth set the tone for generations of Florentine cosmographers and shaped the visual culture of Renaissance geography on the Italian peninsula and beyond.

Incipit of Book One (detail), paint on vellum, from Francesco Berlinghieri, Septe giornate della geographia (Florence, 1482), Milan, Biblioteca Nazionale Braidense.

World Map, copperplate engraving, from Berlinghieri, Septe giornate della geographia (Florence, 1482), Milan, Biblioteca Nazionale Braidense

World Map, paint on vellum, from Berlinghieri, Septe giornate della geographia (Florence, 1482), Milan, Biblioteca Nazionale Braidense. 

(via darksilenceinsuburbia)

poundtheround:

Pound The Round - A blog for the dedicated.. addicted.. & totally obsessed booty loving fiends worldwide.

poundtheround:

Pound The Round - A blog for the dedicated.. addicted.. & totally obsessed booty loving fiends worldwide.

laboratoryequipment:

ADHD Brain Study Finds Slower Development of Key ConnectionsA peek inside the brains of more than 750 children and teens reveals a key difference in brain architecture between those with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and those without. Kids and teens with ADHD, a new study finds, lag behind others of the same age in how quickly their brains form connections within — and between — key brain networks.The result: less-mature connections between a brain network that controls internally-directed thought — such as daydreaming — and networks that allow a person to focus on externally-directed tasks. That lag in connection development may help explain why people with ADHD get easily distracted or struggle to stay focused.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/09/adhd-brain-study-finds-slower-development-key-connections

laboratoryequipment:

ADHD Brain Study Finds Slower Development of Key Connections

A peek inside the brains of more than 750 children and teens reveals a key difference in brain architecture between those with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and those without. Kids and teens with ADHD, a new study finds, lag behind others of the same age in how quickly their brains form connections within — and between — key brain networks.

The result: less-mature connections between a brain network that controls internally-directed thought — such as daydreaming — and networks that allow a person to focus on externally-directed tasks. That lag in connection development may help explain why people with ADHD get easily distracted or struggle to stay focused.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/09/adhd-brain-study-finds-slower-development-key-connections

todayinhistory:

September 15th 1254: Marco Polo born

On this day in 1254, Marco Polo was born in Venice, Italy to a wealthy merchant family. Polo’s father and uncle spent much of his childhood traveling around Asia, especially China where they found favour at the court of Mongol leader Kublai Khan. In 1271, when he was seventeen, Marco left with his father and uncle on their return trip to China. On this journey they visited the Middle East and crossed the Gobi Desert, eventually arriving at Khan’s court where they stayed for 17 years. In this time Marco became Khan’s special envoy, and was sent to areas never before explored by Europeans, including India, Burma and Tibet. Their eventual journey home was arduous, with many of their party perishing on the way. The family also faced hardship when they returned to Venice in 1295, for they struggled to re-enter Venetian society and culture. Marco Polo became involved in Venice’s war with Genoa, and was captured and imprisoned by the Genoese. While imprisoned he told the stories of his travels to his fellow prisoner Rustichello, who wrote them down and eventually published them in The Travels of Marco Polo. Polo’s stories became widely famous and popular, with the fantastic descriptions of foreign places like China and India astonishing contemporary Europeans, many of whom took Polo’s words to be fiction; Polo asserted until his death that it was all true. Marco Polo died in Venice in 1324 aged 69 but his legacy lived on as his unprecedentedly rich and detailed descriptions of foreign lands inspired later generations to explore the world, including Christopher Columbus who brought a copy of Polo’s book on his journey to America in 1492.